Jump To Top

The Parent Resource Centre

I’ll Love You Always – Book Review


I’ll Love You Always

Written by Mark Sperring, illustrated by Alison Brown and published by Bloomsbury.

Also available at Book Depository: I’ll Love You Always

 

Also by Mark Sperring:

Captain McGrew Wants You for His Crew!

Captain McGrew Wants You for His Crew! (Book Depository)

See my review of this book here.

 

Your Hand in My Hand

Your Hand in My Hand (Book Depository)

 

Dino-Baby

Dino-Baby (Book Depository)

 

How Many Sleeps ‘Til My Birthday?

How Many Sleeps ’til my Birthday? (Book Depository)

 

The Book

A rhyming picture book with an age range of 2 to 5. A baby mouse asks its parent, how long will you love me? The parent’s reply is the book, in which the parent (not specifically male or female) explains that they will love their child not for seconds, minutes, days or weeks, but for years and years – always, in fact.

The Pros:

For a snuggly bedtime story, emphasizing how much a child is loved, this has its place. These books are quite popular among children in the age 2-3 range, particularly. But older than that, and it starts to lose something, except on very special occasions.

The illustrations are soft and attractive, featuring woodland creatures and colour changes to help distinguish seasons and the passage of time.

The rhythm of the book is good, and keeps things moving along.

The Cons:

Mark Sperring can do better than this. The rhymes are unconvincing much of the time and there’s an overly sweet sense to parts of the story which grate on my ear. They would go over a younger child’s head, but for a four or five year old they might be pushing things.

I get the concept and the ending brings everything to a close rather neatly; in fact the ending, particularly the last two pages, is the best part of the book. But where the parent is talking on about seconds, minutes and hours being too short, it’s too abstract, even for older kids to make sense of. It’s more like an essay of a parent’s thoughts, not a useful discussion for children. Using the word ‘brief,’ for example – too difficult a concept for most children. It didn’t convince me.

Overall:

I was torn between three and four scoops for this one, considering that it would work well for some kids but not others. In the end I went with my own experience as a parent, and what my own kids would like.

Our Rating (channelling our love of ice cream, our rating system works the way we like our ice cream: the more scoops the better. Besides, good books should be devoured!

Best = four scoops):

two scoops icecream

Two scoops. Nice for a snack!

 

*****

Want to stay informed and find out about what’s new for parents?

We offer an information-packed Informed Parents Newsletter, which will come to your email address every Friday with news, resources, tips, contests and other content for Informed Parents.

Sign Up Here!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *